Teaching

Carnegie Mellon University:

IRP 84-701: Regression Analysis in Political Science (one semester)

This is the first half of the quantitative methods sequence for graduate students in political science. In this course (RAPS I), students will learn the basic techniques of quantitative analysis in political and social science, focusing on exploratory data analysis, hypothesis testing, bivariate associations, ANOVA, and linear regression.

You can find a sample syllabus here.

IRP 84-265: Political Science Research Methods (four semesters)

In this course, students will gain exposure to some of the central ideas in consuming, evaluating, and producing research in political science and other related fields. The course surveys key issues in causal inference and research design at the undergraduate level, with students applying these new concepts and skills to group research projects on a class-wide topic.

You can find a sample syllabus here.

IRP/AMP 84-765: Advanced Research Methods (three semesters)

This course develops and deepens students’ ability to consume, evaluate, and produce research in political science and other related fields. The course surveys key issues in causal inference and research design at the master’s level, while also serving as a workshop for the development of students’ master’s thesis proposals.

You can find a sample syllabus here.

IRP 84-265: War and Peace in the Contemporary Middle East (two semesters)

This course examines the dynamics of war and peace in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Students will investigate key questions and debates about conflict and violence — including the drivers of rebellion, the reasons resistance organizations employ different tactics, and the factors that facilitate peace — with applications to salient cases from around the region.

You can find a sample syllabus here.

Ohio State University:

Political Science 4327: Politics of the Middle East (four semesters)

This course exposes students to some of the most pressing questions and debates around the politics of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, and equips them to critically analyze competing arguments and explanations about these issues with causal reasoning and empirical evidence.

You can find a sample syllabus here.

Political Science 2300: American Foreign Policy (two semesters)

This course explores America’s role in the world. Students will analyze the key actors in the U.S. foreign policy making process as well as some of the most salient issues facing the U.S. in world affairs today, while building up their causal reasoning, critical thinking, and data literacy skills.

You can find a sample syllabus here